What Medical Conditions Qualify For Social Security Disability Or SSI?

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Do you have a qualifying condition for SSD or SSI? Most Americans get a paying job to sustain themselves and their families. For some, medical conditions make this extremely difficult, or even impossible. However, for those people that have a qualifying disability, it’s possible to apply for disability benefits, known either as social security disability or supplemental security income, and get financial assistance from the government.

However, disability benefits are neither quick nor easy to receive. There are specific disabilities that qualify for benefits, and the application for disability benefits is very thorough and strict. Disabilities that qualify for benefits fall under very specific categories. You need a professional medical assessment to back up your claims of having disabilities that qualify for benefits. So how do disability benefits work? If you’re asking yourself, “Do I qualify for disability,” the answer to that question lies in the definitions of a qualifying disability and the application, review, and decision-making process behind disabilities that qualify for benefits.

Let’s Begin.

What Are Social Security Disability Benefits?

The question “Do I qualify for disability,” needs to look first at what these benefits are. How they work for disabilities and if they qualify for benefits. The first and most important factor is government-issued financial assistance. If you have disabilities that qualify for benefits, those disability benefits will come in the form of money.

People with a qualifying disability that are seeking disability benefits have two possible choices: social security disability insurance (SSDI) and supplemental security income (SSI). SSDI and SSI can both go to people with disabilities that qualify for benefits, but the intended recipients for these disability benefits differ slightly, even though the criteria for a qualifying disability may be very similar.

Social Security Disability Benefits and a Qualifying Condition

SSDI is primarily intended for people that were, before their disability, gainfully employed, had already been in the workforce for several years, paid taxes, and are now unable to continue work due to disability. In this sense, workers with disabilities that qualify for benefits have already “paid in” to SSDI because taxes fund SSDI.

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Aside from the usual requirements of being a resident and citizen, you must have a medical evaluation that proves that not only do you have disabilities that qualify for benefits, but you also need the disability benefits because you can no longer work.

Supplemental Security Income for a Qualifying Condition

SSI, on the other hand, still has disabilities that qualify for benefits that must be verifiable and medically evaluated. However, the disability benefits are not strictly for the employed now unable to work.

The major criteria for determining SSI validity are having a qualifying disability and an assessment of financial need. Applicants do not necessarily have to be working and recently disabled to qualify. People of a certain income, the elderly, and even disabled children may have disabilities that qualify for benefits under SSI.

What Is a Qualifying Condition?

There is a very specific list of disabilities that qualify for benefits. Just because you are injured, or sick, it doesn’t mean you automatically have a qualifying disability. Disability benefits are only granted if an applicant’s particular condition appears on an official “list of impairments,” an application is likely to be denied. However, disabilities that qualify for benefits may receive disability benefits if the condition is similar enough, or can be medically verified to resemble a qualifying disability.

So, for example, rheumatoid arthritis falls under disabilities that qualify for benefits. But if you have a similar disorder, that’s not arthritis; you may have a qualifying disability “equaling a disability listing,” and still receive disability benefits.

Disabilities That Qualify For Benefits: A Qualifying Condition

Some of the disabilities that qualify for benefits are as follows. See if you have any of these as a qualifying disability.

Neurological Disorders | Most Common Qualifying Condition

Multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, and cerebral palsy are examples of disabilities that qualify for benefits.

Respiratory Conditions

Asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD) are disabilities that qualify for benefits.

Mental Disorders

Medically diagnosed depression, autism, anxiety, and many others are disabilities that qualify for benefits.

Cardiovascular Issues

A diagnosed heart condition, for example, is a qualifying disability that can get you disability benefits as one of the heart-related disabilities that qualify for benefits.

Musculoskeletal Conditions

Among the back-related disabilities that qualify for benefits, a serious back injury is a common example of a qualifying disability that can get you disability benefits.

Hematological Disorders

Blood-related issues, such as hematolytic disorders or bone marrow failure are disabilities that qualify for benefits.

Digestive Conditions

Liver disease is a qualifying disability that may receive disability benefits, while inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and similar conditions are disabilities that qualify for benefits.

Skin Disorders

A severe affliction of dermatitis is a qualifying disability that may receive disability benefits.

Cancer

Many different types of cancer are considered disabilities that qualify for benefits.

Immunity Disorders

HIV, AIDS, Lupus, and other conditions are all disabilities that qualify for benefits.

Syndromes

Being diagnosed with a specific syndrome, such as Marfan Syndrome or Down Syndrome, is a qualifying disability that may receive disability benefits. 

Sensory Issues

People with conditions or injuries that cause blindness or deafness have disabilities that qualify for benefits.

Mobility

Injuries or conditions that compromise mobility, such as limb amputation, or paralysis have disabilities that qualify for benefits.

Making A Claim on a Qualifying Condition

To apply for disability benefits, you need to correctly fill out an application, have certain documents available such as birth certificate and social security number, as well as a verifiable medical diagnosis of your qualifying disability.

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It’s important to note that it’s not the qualifying disability alone that will get approval. The application process is extremely rigorous, so even minor errors or improper filing can result in a denial, even with a medical diagnosis of a qualifying disability.

So when you ask yourself, “do I qualify for disability,” make sure that you don’t just get a proper medical diagnosis with verifiable documentation. Every detail and step in the application process is crucial, and an error anywhere can result in a denial. If that happens, you can still seek out legal help to appeal and overturn the decision.


Quick Answers on SSD Qualifying Condition

What is a Qualifying Condition?

A qualifying condition may be one of the following: Neurological Disorders, Respiratory Conditions, Mental Disorders, Cardiovascular Issues, Musculoskeletal Conditions, Hematological Disorders, Digestive Conditions, Skin Disorders, Cancer, Immunity Disorders, Syndromes, Sensory Issues, Mobility.


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