Ultimate Ohio Car Insurance Guide | 6 Things You Should Know

ohio car insurance

Driving in Ohio requires a minimum amount of Ohio car insurance coverage. Here we provide a simple Ohio Car Insurance guide to make sure you understand the basics of finding Ohio car insurance.

Fault-Based Insurance

To start, our Ohio car insurance guide should explain fault-based insurance. Ohio car insurance is what is known as fault-based insurance. Fault-based insurance puts the onus on the person who caused the accident. As a result, the person at fault must pay for damages whether it is to the vehicle or personal injuries. Because of this, liability insurance is especially important.

Without Ohio car insurance the injured party can hire an accident lawyer and sue you. If found guilty you might have to sell your home to pay for the damages and the court can also decide to garnish your wages. Therefore this insurance guide shows that Ohio car insurance is well worth the investment.

What If I Am Injured in a Car Accident?

This insurance guide provides information on fault-based insurance. Since this insurance puts the onus on the person who caused the accident, if you are the one injured in the car accident, you can pursue one of the following options to get paid through Ohio car insurance:

  • Subrogation: This is the formal term for filing a claim with your own insurance company. When you take this route, your insurance company provides the money and then will go after the at-fault driver’s insurance provider to get their money back.  
  • Third-Party Claim: This claim is filed with the at-fault driver’s insurance company. This is a more difficult path because you might not know where to begin. As well, the driver might dispute the claim. Both these challenges interfere with how quickly you get your money. As well, you probably end up asking your insurance company how to do this, so you might as well go with subrogation instead.
  • Lawsuit: You can also choose to sue the at-fault driver. This requires an accident lawyer to file a personal injury lawsuit in civil court for you. Using this approach is best if it appears your damages go above the at-fault driver’s policy limits. However, if you also feel you did not get a fair amount offered by the at-fault driver’s insurance company, contacting an accident lawyer is your best course of action.

The more complicated your damages and/or injuries, the more frustrating it can become to deal directly with companies providing Ohio auto insurance without an insurance guide. Even with an insurance guide, when you are the victim, having an accident lawyer in your corner can prove to be the best way to get your money from Ohio car insurance companies quickly for the highest amount. With an accident lawyer, you can get the money you deserve without getting taken advantage of by Ohio car insurance companies working in their own best interests.

Minimum Required Ohio Car Insurance

According to the insurance guide, the minimum amount of Ohio car insurance required is as follows:

  • Ohio car insurance for $25,000 for bodily injury or death of 1 person in an accident
  • Ohio car insurance for $50,000 for total bodily injury or death in an accident (i.e., for all persons harmed in one accident)
  • Ohio car insurance for $25,000 for property damage per accident

Your Ohio car insurance liability covers both bodily injuries and property damage you might cause in a car accident. So if you cause an accident, you can rest easy knowing your Ohio car insurance covers these damages. However, this insurance guide should point out that you also have to keep in mind if your insurance coverage is only the minimum required, you are held responsible to pay the balance.

So it is always in your best interest to be realistic about possible damages based on your past driving behavior. For example, should you cause an accident and there are four people with injuries in the other car, your $50,000 is not likely to cover it. The full $50,000 of your coverage is paid out evenly to each person injured, and then you pay the balance. This will lead to a lawsuit with an accident lawyer working in the interest of the injured party.

Driving Uninsured in Ohio

As you can see, this insurance guide has shown the costs associated with a car accident can be substantial. If you choose not to drive with Ohio car insurance and you cause an accident, you not only have to pay the full amount for the damages, but you also face penalties for driving without Ohio car insurance. Our insurance guide shows the penalties for driving without Ohio car insurance are applied based on how often you have been caught driving uninsured. This includes:

  • First offense You will have your driver’s license suspended until you can prove you have acquired insurance. You also must pay a $160 restoration fee for vehicle registration and license plates and whatever fines are imposed by the court.
  • Second offense: If you are caught twice, the fines imposed by the court will be higher. You will also have your driver’s license suspended for 1 year and have to pay a $360 restoration fee.
  • Third offense: Strike three sees increased fines and a suspension of your license for 2 years. To restore your registration it costs $660.

Regardless of whether you are in an accident or not, if pulled over by police without proof of your Ohio car insurance you will lose your license and face potentially hefty fines. An accident lawyer or insurance guide can’t help you here. Instead, you’ll have to prove you have Ohio car insurance or pay the piper.

Purchasing Uninsured Ohio Car Insurance

This sounds like an oxymoron. However, this insurance guide felt it important to mention to protect yourself from drivers without Ohio car insurance you can purchase either optional uninsured motorist (UM) or underinsured motorist (UIM) coverage. UM, insurance provides coverage for both bodily injury and property damage for yourself and passengers should you be in a car crash with someone without Ohio car insurance.

You can also opt for underinsured motorist (UIM) coverage which takes care of damages from someone who might not have enough coverage. While it might seem you shouldn’t have to pay extra to cover someone else’s failings, it can work out in the long run. Your other option would be to sue the at-fault driver to cover the balance with the help of an accident lawyer.

Your Insurance Company’s Responsibilities

A complete insurance guide wouldn’t be complete without a few words on the responsibilities of insurance companies. All insurance companies must provide an accident lawyer to defend against claims on your policy if your policy provides coverage for the claim. As well, they must cover losses up to your policy limits when you are liable for an accident. On the flips side, should you be the victim of a driver, their insurance company has a duty to “act reasonably.” This means they cannot deny your legitimate insurance claims and must act promptly to provide your funding.

This Ohio car insurance guide helps provide the information you need on Ohio car insurance. It also helps you decide if it is time to call an accident lawyer. If you suspect an insurance company or at-fault driver is not acting reasonably, you should speak to an accident lawyer right away to get the money that is owed to you.

Quick Answers

What is Fault Based Insurance?

Fault-based insurance puts the onus on the person who caused the accident. As a result, the person at fault must pay for damages whether it is to the vehicle or personal injuries. Because of this, liability insurance is especially important.

What is the Minimum Required for Car Insurance in Ohio?

Ohio car insurance for $25,000 for bodily injury or death of 1 person in an accident
Ohio car insurance for $50,000 for total bodily injury or death in an accident (i.e., for all persons harmed in one accident)
Ohio car insurance for $25,000 for property damage per accident

What Happens if I Drive Uninsured?

First offense You will have your driver’s license suspended until you can prove you have acquired insurance. You also must pay a $160 restoration fee for vehicle registration and license plates and whatever fines are imposed by the court.
Second offense: If you are caught twice, the fines imposed by the court will be higher. You will also have your driver’s license suspended for 1 year and have to pay a $360 restoration fee.
Third offense: Strike three sees increased fines, and a suspension of your license for 2 years. To restore your registration it costs $660.