Is Social Media Hurting My Personal Injury Case?

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Social media is a great tool for communicating with those you care about. It’s a useful way to share your personal life, but you need to set some restrictions.

Your social media posts can prove to be the downfall of your personal injury case. With social media, perception is everything. You need to ensure that you’re not presenting the opposition with any material to invalidate your claim. Dyer, Garofalo, Mann & Schultz cares about your case, and we’ll advise you to be smart about what you post on Facebook, Instagram, or anywhere else. Take these social media warnings into account when you’re trying to build a personal injury case in Ohio.

Let’s Begin.

What You Shouldn’t Share About Your Case

Your personal injury case in Ohio, like any other legal proceedings, is a serious matter. Information about the case shouldn’t be readily shared with anyone on social media as it can compromise your chances of getting the verdict you want.

If you’re a plaintiff in a personal injury case in Ohio, you may be asked to produce relevant photographs, videos, and documents from your social media accounts. To ensure your credibility isn’t called into question, don’t post anything about your personal injury case on your social media accounts. The photographs, videos, and documents are all important pieces of evidence used to buffer your personal injury case, helping to prove the extent of the injury.

Discussions that you’ve had with your lawyer both directly and indirectly related to your personal injury case shouldn’t be shared on social media. Avoid sharing your feelings about the case in a status, comment, visuals, or other social media features. These are things that can be used against you by a defense attorney during your personal injury case to undermine your arguments.

The opposition will try to use any posts about your personal injury case on social media to contradict your own testimony. If you claim you have an injured arm or a back injury, but post on social media that you’re going bowling or playing golf, the defense can challenge your injury’s severity or legitimacy entirely. During a personal injury case, you must be honest about the extent of your injury as well as any losses that you’ve incurred as a result. Anything on social media that suggests your injury isn’t as serious as you claim can lead to your case being dismissed.

How Social Media Can Be Used in Court

With the pervasive adoption of social media, attorneys and insurance providers can more easily gather evidence to dispel the legitimacy of a personal injury case. Social media investigation enables the opposition to forego the necessity of hiring private investigators. Proving that a person’s personal injury claim is exaggerated can be done with a few clicks if the plaintiff isn’t careful with their postings.

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If you’ve made a claim suggesting you’re in enough physical pain that you cannot partake in physical activity, ensure your post-accident photos or videos don’t suggest otherwise. If you show yourself at an Ohio gym or doing rigorous activities that require some physical strain, such visuals can be used as evidence against you in an Ohio courtroom. So, any controversial status posts or pictures and videos can be used to prove you’re unreliable and that your claim is invalid, and in the worst case, fraudulent. You should also beware of friends on social media tagging you in potentially incriminating pictures.

It’s not illegal for law teams in Ohio to collect this information via social media. It is perfectly lawful for publicly posted information on social media to be extracted and admitted as evidence in a personal injury case or any legal forum. Attorneys can collect your posts by simply right-clicking and saving the social media visuals, or by taking screenshots.

They can also track any check-ins that you’ve made on social media. Check-ins reveal a person’s location on Facebook, Twitter, and other social media websites. These check-ins show you at a location like a yoga class or gym. Any check-ins, even if you didn’t go to participate in physical activity, can damage your personal injury case.

Deleting your social media account won’t help either. Erasing social media activity is considered serious, making it appear as if you were deleting evidence that could be used to challenge your personal injury case. Deleting social media content during legal proceedings gives the defendant’s attorney reasonable suspicion. Plus, with new-gen forensic technology available to recover permanently deleted social media posts, it’s useless to do so. To protect yourself and your privacy, you can change the privacy settings on your social media accounts so that random or unfamiliar people can’t access your posts.

Contacting a Personal Injury Lawyer

Dyer, Garofalo, Mann & Schultz can help Ohio residents like you secure the compensation you deserve in a personal injury case following an accident. Don’t let social media compromise your case. We’ll advise you on the best steps to securing your claim’s success, including staying off social media.

We’ve been helping Ohio residents build and file their personal injury claims since 1990. You can rely on our long-standing Ohio firm to put you in the best position to win damages. Dyer, Garofalo, Mann & Schultz will consult with you and determine the best path forward to arguing your personal injury claim. We will get to work collecting your testimony, medical records, and evidence that another party was responsible for your accident. We work to get you the compensation you need to cover medical expenses, future appointments, and more. Your injury can’t be undone, but you can get the tools you need to facilitate your recovery and cope with your pain and suffering.

If you’ve been injured in a preventable accident due to the negligence of another person or entity, contact Dyer, Garofalo, Mann & Schultz. To start building your personal injury case, call 1-866-7885-3149 for your free consultation and to get your life back!


Quick Answers

What Shouldn’t You Post on Facebook?

Don’t post anything about your personal injury case on your social media accounts. The photographs, videos, and documents are all important pieces of evidence used to buffer your personal injury case, helping to prove the extent of the injury.

Learn More About Cases

How Can Facebook Be Used in Court?

If you’ve made a claim suggesting you’re in enough physical pain that you cannot partake in physical activity, ensure your post-accident photos or videos don’t suggest otherwise. If you show yourself at an Ohio gym or doing rigorous activities that require some physical strain, such visuals can be used as evidence against you in an Ohio courtroom.

Learn More About Cases


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