10 Back Injuries that Qualify for Disability

back injuries that qualify for disability

When back injuries and back pain keep you from working applying for social security disability benefits could be your best option. You require some form of income to help pay for your medical bills and treatment, not to mention to help cover your living costs. The good news is you could be eligible to apply for SSDI for back injuries. Social Security Disability benefits are available through the Social Security Administration (SSA). The Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program is available to support those who have suffered a back injury and have not earned sufficient credits through working.

You can also qualify for social security disability with sufficient credits and can show you paid enough taxes as well as meet a long list of criteria to qualify for back injuries on SSDI or social security benefits. While applying for SSDI can be confusing and frustrating, a lawyer who understands back injuries on SSDI can make it easier to cope and get the treatment you need. Here we look at back injuries on SSDI, social security disability and how a lawyer can assist should you be turned down.

SSDI for Back Injuries and Problems

A lawyer helps prove back injuries and conditions can make it impossible to work. They understand when it comes to suffering from back-related health issues, claiming back injuries on SSDI is a challenge. According to the social security disability process, to qualify for back injuries on SSDI you have to suffer from a medical condition that lasts at least one year.

With so many conditions of the spine that can keep you from working, you have to prove that your condition is related to an abnormality of the spin, or spinal canal. Diagnosis for back injuries on SSDI must include proof with MRIs, x-rays, and a physician’s note with an explanation of the tests and details of the examination and diagnosis. Conditions for back injuries on SSDI might include:

  • Degenerative disc disorder
  • Arachnoiditis
  • Spondylitis
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Herniated discs
  • Nerve root compression
  • Scoliosis
  • Spinal stenosis
  • Spondylolisthesis

So, the first step to qualify for back injuries on SSDI is to set up an appointment with your doctor. An examination will prove you suffer from a debilitating back condition that causes severe pain and discomfort that interferes with your ability to work. This then allows you to receive social security disability benefits.

Social Security Disability for Back Pain Treatment

The cost of treating low back, neck pain and other musculoskeletal disorders in the United States cost over $264 billion per year. Without support for back injuries on SSDI, patients can face astronomical medical bills without any source of income to cover it. The good news is social security disability benefits are available. The bad news is it can be difficult to qualify for social security disability benefits. That’s why many back-injury patients work with a lawyer to ensure they can treat their back injuries on SSDI. Some of the fees you face include:

  • Co-pays and coinsurance for doctor visits, specialists, chiropractors, and physical therapy
  • Prescriptions for painkillers, steroids, and muscle relaxers
  • Steroid injections
  • Further testing including x-rays, MRI scans, and cat scans

Even with health insurance on average back patients pay out about $2580 more in medical costs per year than those without back issues. In the cases where back surgery is required the costs can be from $65,000 for Medicare or about $100,000 through private insurance. A lawyer can help you get the social security disability you need for back injuries on SSDI.

Social Security Disability Evaluation

When you apply for social security disability, you are up against the SSA’s own medical guide. This guide is used to evaluate disability benefits applications to determine if you qualify for back injuries on SSDI. This “Blue Book” sets up the criteria for back injuries on SSDI and whether applicants are considered disabled. Interestingly, the book does not include a specific listing for back pain or back injuries on SSDI, so you have to look for conditions they feel cause back pain.

This is just one example of why a lawyer might be needed to help you when applying for back injuries on SSDI. For example, while you won’t find a listing for degenerative disc disease, you will find one for rheumatoid arthritis. So although degenerative disc disease can lead to nerve problems and even interfere with your ability to walk, it is not considered a back condition that might require social security disability benefits. A lawyer can help you through the process so that regardless of what is causing your back pain, you can have the required medical evidence to show you are unable to work due to physical limitations. This way you will fall under those qualified for back injuries on SSDI.

Medical Proof for Back Injuries on SSDI

Because lawyers deal with patients rejected for social insurance disability for back pain, they understand the documentation required to help make it clear you are eligible. Doctor’s notes explaining your limitations, proof you require assistance to walk or have become completely immobile all help feed information to the social security disability process to help you qualify for back injuries on SSDI.  Under Section 1.04 of the Blue Book relates to spine disorders and meeting the criteria to fall under this category is based on their medical guide including the following conditions:

  • Lumbar spinal stenosis: Causing pain in the thighs, lower extremities, and buttocks making it difficult to walk or to stand for long periods of time.
  • Spinal arachnoiditis: Causing burning pain, so it is uncomfortable to remain in one position even for an hour.
  • Nerve compression: Causing loss of reflexes and range of motion that interferes with your ability to perform basic tasks and movements.

Working with a lawyer to assist with back injuries on SSDI helps make the process easier.

Medical-Vocational Allowance

While the process might seem discouraging, even if you are unable to apply using a back-related condition in the Blue Book, social security disability benefits can still be received based on the medical-vocational allowance. Instead of referring to a specific condition, you present symptoms, limitations, and information about your condition. Other information such as your age, whether or not you have transferable skills to apply for other jobs, your education and your work experience are also considered.

A lawyer with expertise in seeking social security disability benefits can guide you through the process and help fill out the residual functioning capacity (RFC) form. Your doctor provides detailed information about your condition right down to how often you find yourself having to change positions or how long you can sit or stand. Walking, general mobility and whether you require assistive devices are also included. An important consideration for back injuries on SSDI is whether you need to take pain medications that can inhibit performance and side effects that interfere with your ability to work safely such as becoming dizzy or drowsy.

A thorough overview from your lawyer including other medical conditions you might have will explain how your life is impacted by your health issues and why you are unable to continue to work. A lawyer using this approach to apply for social security disability benefits proves you can’t transfer your skills to change jobs and find employment elsewhere. With a lawyer, you can prove you are unable to work for at least a year and qualify for back injuries on SSDI.

Quick Answers

What Back Injuries Qualify?

Arachnoiditis
Spondylitis
Osteoarthritis
Rheumatoid arthritis
Herniated discs
Nerve root compression
Scoliosis
Spinal stenosis
Spondylolisthesis

Learn More

What Proof Do You Need to Qualify?

Lumbar spinal stenosis: Causing pain in the thighs, lower extremities, and buttocks making it difficult to walk or to stand for long periods of time.

Spinal arachnoiditis: Causing burning pain, so it is uncomfortable to remain in one position even for an hour.

Nerve compression: Causing loss of reflexes and range of motion that interferes with your ability to perform basic tasks and movements.